A14: Badimaya

AIATSIS code: 
A14
AIATSIS reference name: 
Badimaya

tabs_horizontal

Name
ABN name
-
ABS name
Badimaya
Horton name
Badimaya
Ethnologue name
Badimaya
ISO 639-3 code
bia
Tindale name
Barimaia
Thesaurus heading language
Badimaya language A14
Thesaurus heading (old)
Badimaya language (A14) (WA SH50-03)
Tindale (1974)
Parimaia (valid alternative), Bardimaia, Badimaia, Badimala, Padimaia, Badimara, Patimara, Wardal, Waadal (means 'west' in Pini language), Bidungu (name given by Wadjari meaning 'users of rockhole water,' derogatory term implying shiftlessness).
O'Grady et al (1966)
Glottocode
badi1246
Other sources
Yamadyis [<ozbib>Dunn (1988:30)$1723</ozbib>]
Synonyms
Parti maya, Badimaia, Badimara, Barimaia, Nanakari, Patimara, Patimay, Baadeemaia, Badimala, Bardimaia, Bidungu, Padimaia, Padinaia, Parimaia, Waadal, Wallawe, WardalBadi maia, Yamadgee, Yamaji, Patimaya, Bardimaya, Badimay, Yamadyis, Wardal, Badimia
Comment
Comments: 
Bednall (2014:103) says that there are at least two varieties of Badimaya, spoken in the north and south of Badimaya country respectively, though they do not have particular names - it is all Badimaya language.
References: 
  • Bednall, James. 2014. Badimaya dictionary: an Aboriginal language of Western Australia. Geraldton, WA: Bundiyarra - Irra Wangga Language Centre. (L B134.003/2)
  • Dunn, Leone. 1988. Badimaya, a Western Australian language. In Papers in Australian Linguistics 17, ed. P. Austin, et al., 19-149. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Gargett, Andrew. 2011. A salvage grammar of Malgana: the language of Shark Bay, Western Australia. Pacific Linguistics 624. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Tindale, Norman B. 1974. Aboriginal tribes of Australia: their terrain, environmental controls, distribution, limits, and proper names. Berkeley: University of California Press/Canberra: Australian National University Press.
Status: 
Confirmed
Location
State / Territory: 
WA
Location information: 
A large area around Lake Moore - Ninghan Station - Paynes Find. The traditional area of the Badimaya includes a large area south-west of the area recorded by Tindale (1974), although Tindale does indicate 'disputed territory' in this region. However, the territory around Lake Moore/Ninghan is attested, as my informant, Mr Joe Benjamin, can trace site ownership back three generations. Today, the Madimaya are scattered in towns throughout the Murchison Region in Mullewa, Cue, Mingenew, Mt Magnet, Yalgoo, Carnarvon, and Meekatharra. There are many people remaining of Badimaya descent, but if they speak a traditional language, it is usually Watjarri, otherwise known as the 'Murchison' or 'Yamadyi' language, which has become the dominant language of the region (Dunn 1988:20). At Cue, Nannine, Mount Magnet; southwest almost to Yalgoo, northwestern boundary is on Sandford River divide (Tindale 1974).
Maps: 
  • Tindale, Norman. 1974. Tribal boundaries in Aboriginal Australia. Canberra: Division of National Mapping, Department of National Development.
  • Douglas, Wilfrid. 1976. The Aboriginal languages of the south-west of Australia, 2nd edn. Canberra: AIAS
  • Douglas, Wilfrid. 1981. Watjarri. In Handbook of Australian languages vol. 2, eds RMW Dixon and B Blake, 196-272. Canberra: ANU Press
  • Dunn, Leone. 1988. Badimaya, a Western Australian language. In Papers in Australian Linguistics 17, eds P Austin et al., 19 - 149. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Marmion, Doug. 1996. A description of the morphology of Wajarri, University of New England: BA (Hons)
Catalogue
Links
Programs
Activities: 
-
People: 
Leone Dunn, Doug Marmion, Irra Wangga - Geraldton Language Programme (formally Yamadji Language Centre)
Indigenous organisations: 
-
Speakers
Year Source Speaker numbers
1975Oates-
1984Senate-
1990Schmidt-
1996Census-
2001Census-
2004NILS3
2005Estimate3
2006Census-
2011Census-
2016Census3

Speaker numbers were measured differently across the censuses and various other sources listed in AUSTLANG. You are encouraged to refer to the sources.

Speaker numbers for ‘NILS 2004’ and ‘2005 estimate’ come from 'Table F.3: Numbers of speakers of Australian Indigenous languages (various surveys)' in 'Appendix F NILS endangerment and absolute number results' in McConvell, Marmion and McNicol 2005, pages 198-230 (PDF, 2.5MB).

Documentation
Type Documentation Status Documentation Score
Word list Small (20-100 pages) 2
Text Collection Small (20-100 pages) 2
Grammar Small grammar (100-200 pages) 3
Audio-visual 1-10 2
Manuscript note: 
tape transcription/field note available (Phrases)
Grammar: 

Dunn, Leone. 1988. Badimaya, a Western Australian language. In Papers in Australian Linguistics 17, eds P Austin et al., 19 - 149. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.

Dictionary: 
Marmion, Doug (Yamadji Language Centre). Badimaya Dictionary, ASEDA 615.
Classification
Source Family Group Sub-group Name Relationship
Ethnologue (2005) Pama-Nyungan South-West Wadjari Badimaya Badimaya [dialects: Related to Wajarri]
Dixon (2002) MOORE RIVER TO GASCOYNE RIVER GROUP Watjarri/Parti-maya subgroup* Parti-maya Parti-maya Dunn (1988)
Wurm (1994) Pama-Nyungan South-West Badimay
Walsh (1981) Pama-Nyungan South-West Wadjari Badimay
Oates (1975) Pama-Nyungan Pilbara-Nyungar (Southwest) Wadjari Bardimaya
Wurm (1972) Pama-Nyungan Southwest (or Nyungic) Kardu | Nyungar Bardimaya | Patimay
O'Grady, Voegelin and Voegelin (1966) Pama-Nyungan Southwest Kardu Bardimaya