K18: Ngarinyin

AIATSIS Code: 
K18
AIATSIS Reference name: 
Ngarinyin

tab group

Name
ABN Name
Ngarinjin language
ABS Name
Ngarinyin
Horton Name
Ngarinyin
Ethnologue name
Ngarinyin
ISO 639-3 code
ung
Tindale name
Ngarinjin
Thesaurus heading
Ngarinyin / Ungarinyin language (K18) (WA SE 52-01)
Tindale (1974)
Gular (name given to hordes between Karunjie and Gibb River Stations by Forrest River people; ['kular] = west), Ungarinjin, Un?arinjin (as spoken by a Worora), Warnarinjin, Angarinjin, Ngarinjin (as articulated by Moreng), Wangarinjinu (language name), Arawari (lit. 'southeastwards,' a Worora name), Ingarinjindja (a man of the tribe), Njingarinjanja (a woman of the tribe), Arkarin-jindja (people of the tribe), Oladjau (language name used by Miriwung tribe; their contacts are through the Kitja to Ola people), Marangana (name applied to all people who speak like the Ngarinjin), Walmidi (Forrest River name), Andedja (northern term), Andidja, Narrinyind, Ungarinyin, Ungarin-jen, Ngaring-ngyan, Ngerringun, Kandjalngari (name of a horde on northern boundary of tribe).
O'Grady et al (1966)
Ungarinjin, Narrinyind
Glottocode
ngar1284
Other sources
Wulanggu (Bardi term for Wunambal and Ungarinyin - Wilfrid Goonak p.c.) [Carr 2000:13]
Synonyms
Ngarinyin
Ungarinjin
Guwij
Munumburru
Ngarinjin
Ngarnawu
Wilawila
Wolyamidi
Andedja
Andidja
Angarinjin
Arawari
Arkarinjindja
Arkarrinyinjia
Gular
Ingarinjindja
Kandjalngari
Marangana
Molyamidi
Narrinyina
Narrinyind
Narrinyindi
Ngaring ngyan
Ngerringun
Njingarinjanja
Ogarinyan
Oladjau
Ungarinin
Ungarinjen
Ungarinyin
Unggarinjin
Unjarinjin
Unnarinjin
Walmidi
Wangarinjinu
Warnarinjin
WolJamidi
Wulanggu
Unarinjin
Arkarin jindja
Ungarin jen
Comment
Language comment
According to Rumsey (1982:vii), Ngarinyin can be used to refer to either the language name or the people who speak it, but Ungarinyin can only be used to refer to the language. McGregor (2004:30) also describes the difference between forms, but remarks that 'Ngarinyin has been chosen as the preferred language name' by the community. Spronck reports that there are about a dozen fluent elderly Ungarinyin (K18) speakers and a group of up to 50 younger people with a good passive understanding of the language. He also notes that up to about 15 non-Ngarinyin people are fluent in Ungarinyin (K18), as most elderly Worrorra K17 and Wunambal K22 people speak Ungarinyin rather than their own language (Spronck 2013 p.c.). Coate and Oates (1970) say that Guwidj K19 is a dialect of Ngarinjin (K18).
References

Coate, H. and L. Oates. 1970. A grammar of Ngarinjin, Western Australia: Australian Aboriginal Studies 25, Linguistic Series 10. Canberra: AIAS.
Harvey, Mark. 2008. Non-Pama-Nyungan Languages: land-language associations at colonisation. AILEC 0802.
McGregor, William. 2004. The languages of the Kimberley, Western Australia. New York: RoutledgeCurzon.
Rumsey, Alan. 1982. An intra-sentence grammar of Ungarinjin, north-western Australia. Pacific Linguistics B-86. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics. (RS 40/4)
Tindale, Norman B. 1974. Aboriginal tribes of Australia: their terrain, environmental controls, distribution, limits, and proper names. Berkeley: University of California Press/Canberra: Australian National University Press.

Status
Confirmed
Location
State
WA
Location information
From Walcott Inlet at Mount Page, southeast along the north face of the King Leopold Range in the Isdell Valley to Isdell Range, thence east to Phillips Range, the headwaters of Chapman River, Blackfellow Creek, and Wood River; north along the Barnett and Harris Ranges; at Gibb River junction with upper Drysdale; on upper waters of Drysdale River to near Maitland Range; on King River headwaters north to about Mount Reid; west to about Mounts Bradshaw and Hann; southeast to Mount French on the highlands, thence south by west to Walcott Inlet opposite Mount Page (Tindale 1974) The general association was to the western half of the Kimberley Plateau. Eastward limit: Mt House homestead, upper Hann River drainage, Gibb River homestead, Gibb River drainage, Dampier Creek drainage, Banjo Creek drainage - all of these are associated with Ngarinyin. Northward limit: Couchman Ranges, King Edward River to upstream of the Mitchell Plateau road crossing - both associated with Ngarinyin. Oombrai Hill, the King Edward River downstream from the Mitchell Plateau road crossing, Morgan River drainage - none of these three were associated with Ngarinyin. Westward limit: King Edward River to upstream of the Mitchell Plateau road crossing, Upper Moran River, Upper Roe River, Upper Prince Regent River, Upper Sale River including Pantijan, Upper Walcott Inlet and Calder River, Isdell River mouth - all associated with Ngarinyin. Southward limit: King Leopold Range, Isdell Range. Bell Creek was associated with Unggumi and not with Ngarinyin (Harvey ASEDA 802)
Maps
-
Catalogue
Search MURA the AIATSIS catalogue, for items about this language
Speakers
Speaker table
Speaker NILS table
1-19 years20-39 years40-59 years60+
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NILS endangerment grade
0
Documentation
Document Score: 
13
Documentation table: 
TypeDocumentation StatusDocumentation Score
Word listLarge (more than 200 pages)4
Text CollectionSmall (20-100 pages)2
GrammarLarge grammar (more than 200 pages)4
Audio-visualMore than 103
Manuscript Note: 
tape transcription/field note available
Grammar: 
Rumsy, Alan. 1978. A grammar of Ungarinjin with special reference to the structure of discourse, University of Chicago: PhD.
Dictionary: 
Coate, H. H. J. 1974. Ngarinjin-English dictionary. Sydney:University Of Sydney.
Programs
Activities: 
Community adult literacy programmes have been run in the past for Worrorra, Wunambal and Ngarinyin (K18). (Carr 2000:22) Stef Spronck is working with Ngarinyin people to begin a school language program in the Mt. Barnett community some time in 2013, with support from the native title group and local rangers. (Spronck 2013 p.c.)
People: 
Howard Coate, Alan Rumsey, Kimberley Language Resource Centre, Stef Spronck
Indigenous organisations: 
-
Classification
Classification table: 
SourceFamilyGroupSub-groupNameRelationship
Ethnologue (2005)WororanNgarinyinNgarinyin [dialects: Wilawila, Wolyamidi, Guwidj, Wurla (Worla, Worlaja, Wula, Ola, Walar, Wuladja, Wuladjangari)]
Dixon (2002)NORTH KIMBERLEY AREAL GROUPUngarinjinUngarinjin Rumsey (1982a) further dialects: Guwidj (Orla), Waladja, Ngarnawu, Andadjin, Munumburru, Wolyamidi, Waladjangarri
Wurm (1994)WororanUngarinjinicUngarinjin
Walsh (1981)WororanUngarinjinicUngarinjin (Ngarinjin)
Oates (1975)WororanNgarinjinicNgarinjin
Wurm (1972)WororanNgarinyinicNgarinyin(Ungarinyin)
O'Grady, Voegelin & Voegelin (1966)WororanUngarinyinicUngarinyin