L2: Nauo / Nawu

AIATSIS code: 
L2
AIATSIS reference name: 
Nauo / Nawu

tabs_horizontal

Name
ABN name
-
ABS name
-
Horton name
Nawu
Ethnologue name
Wirangu (Nhawu)
ISO 639-3 code
-
Tindale name
Nauo
Thesaurus heading language
Nauo / Nawu language L2
Thesaurus heading (old)
Nawo / Nawu language (L2) (SA SI53-07)
Tindale (1974)
Njau, Njao, Ngao (pronunciation of a Pangkala man in 1939), Nawo, Naua, Nowo, Gnowoo, Kadu (= man), Battara (['bat:ara] = scrubby gum), Wiljaru (of Pangkala tribe, means 'westerners'), Willuro, Hilleri (Howitt on his 1904 map at p. 44 placed the name Hilleri incorrectly; his text is more correct; the term had a derogatory meaning somewhat like the term Aluritja in central Australia and implied they came out of the Western Desert), Kartawon-gulta (name of language).
O'Grady et al (1966)
Nauo, Nawo, Naua, Nowo, Growoo, Battara
Glottocode
-
Other sources
-
Synonyms
Nhawu, Wirangu, Battara, Gnowoo, Growoo, Hilleri, Kadu, Kartwongulta, Naua, Nawa, Nawo, Ngao, Njao, Njau, Nowo, Wiljaru, Willuro, Kartawon gulta
Comment
Comments: 

Hercus and Simpson (2001) examine the sources on Nauo (L2) including East (1889), who considers Nauo to be 'a type of' Wirangu C1 and Grey (1845), who treats Nauo, Wirangu and Mirniny A9 as a single 'dialect' . Comparing sample words in early vocabularies from Barngarla L6, Nauo and Wirangu, Hercus and Simpson say that the linguistic evidence suggests Nauo was one of a group of 'mutually intelligible dialects which constitute the language called "Wirangu" ' (270-273), though they conclude that Nauo appears to be 'a separate language, but "in between" Wirangu and Barngarla' (287). Hercus (1999:14) reports that one of her informants considered Nyawa (L2) to be a dialect of Parnkalla L6.

In 2004 Simpson and Hercus describe Naou (L2) as a member of the Thura-Yura L63 sub-group of Pama-Nyungan. Other members include Kaurna L3Ngadjuri L5Nukunu L4; Narangga L1; Barngarla L6Adnyamathana  L10Kuyani L9 and Wirangu C1, which exhibits some differences with the Thura-Yura languages. One particular cultural-linguistic feature uniquely Thura-Yura is the use of ten birth-order names. Another are the regular pronoun forms unique to the sub-group (2004:179).

References: 
  • East, J.J. 1889. The Aborigines of South and Central Australia. Proceedings of the Royal Society of South Australia. Field Naturalists' Section 1888/9, pp. [15]-26. (p EAS)
  • Grey, George, Sir. 1845. On the languages of Australia, being an extract of a dispatch from Captain G. Grey, Governor of South Australia, to Lord Stanley. (p GRE)
  • Hercus, Luise. 1999. A grammar of the Wirangu language from the West Coast of South Australia: Pacific Linguistics C-150. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Hercus, Luise & Jane Simpson. 2001. The tragedy of Nauo. In Forty years on: Ken Hale and Australian languages, ed. Jane Simpson, et al., 263-290. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Simpson, J & L Hercus. 2004. Thura-Yura as a subgroup, in (Bowern & Koch eds) Australian Languages : classification and the comparative method. Amsterdam/Philadelphia : John Benjamins.

  • Tindale, Norman B. 1974. Aboriginal tribes of Australia: their terrain, environmental controls, distribution, limits, and proper names. Berkeley: University of California Press/Canberra: Australian National University Press.
Status: 
Confirmed
Location
State / Territory: 
SA
Location information: 

Southwestern half of Eyre Peninsula; west to Cape Radstock, north to beyond Minnipa; east to near Darke Peak; west of Cleve and halfway between Carrow and Franklin Harbor; at Port Lincoln, Mount Hope, Coffin Bay, and Elliston (Tindale 1974). Port Lincoln, on the coast to the south-west of the settlement (Schurmann 1987:152-2 in Hercus and Simpson 2001:264). The western boundary has been suggested as near Elliston (cf. Hercus and Simpson 2001:270-272).

Maps: 
-
Catalogue
Links
Programs
Activities: 
-
People: 
-
Indigenous organisations: 
-
Speakers
Year Source Speaker numbers
1975Oates0
1984Senate-
1990Schmidt-
1996Census-
2001Census-
2004NILS-
2005Estimate-
2006Census-
2011Census-
2016Census-

Speaker numbers were measured differently across the censuses and various other sources listed in AUSTLANG. You are encouraged to refer to the sources.

Speaker numbers for ‘NILS 2004’ and ‘2005 estimate’ come from 'Table F.3: Numbers of speakers of Australian Indigenous languages (various surveys)' in 'Appendix F NILS endangerment and absolute number results' in McConvell, Marmion and McNicol 2005, pages 198-230 (PDF, 2.5MB).

Documentation
Type Documentation Status Documentation Score
Word list Less than 20 pages 1
Text Collection None 0
Grammar None 0
Audio-visual None 0
Manuscript note: 
not available
Grammar: 
-
Dictionary: 
-
Classification
Source Family Group Sub-group Name Relationship
Ethnologue (2005) Pama-Nyungan South-West Wirangu Wirangu (Nhawu)  
Dixon (2002)       Nhawu Wirangu Hercus (1999) possible further dialect: Nhawu
Wurm (1994) Pama-Nyungan South-West   Nawu  
Walsh (1981) Pama-Nyungan South-West Yura Nawu  
Oates (1975) Pama-Nyungan Southern Western Desert Type Yura Nawu  
Wurm (1972) Pama-Nyungan Southwest (or Nyungic) Yura Nawu (Nawo)  
O'Grady, Voegelin and Voegelin (1966) Pama-Nyungan Southwest Yura Nawu