Y128: Gugu Badhun

AIATSIS Code: 
Y128
AIATSIS Reference name: 
Gugu Badhun

tab group

Name
ABN Name
-
ABS Name
-
Horton Name
Gugu-Badhun
Ethnologue name
Gugu Badhun
ISO 639-3 code
gdc
Tindale name
Kokopatun
Thesaurus heading
Gugu Badhun language (Y128) (Qld SE55-05)
Tindale (1974)
Patun, Koko Padun, ? Jullanku.
O'Grady et al (1966)
Glottocode
gugu1253
Other sources
Koko-Patun (Sharp 1939:441) [Sutton 1973]
Synonyms
Gudjal
Guridjal
Kokopatun
Kutjala
Warungu
Badun
Breaba
Breeaba
Jullanku
Koko Padun
KokoPatun
Koko Badun
Patun
Koko Patun
Comment
Language comment
Gugu-Badhun (Y128) has been classified as a member of the 'Upper Burdekin group' along with Warrungu Y133 and Gudjal E60 (Sutton, 1973 in Breen 2009:243). Sutton speculates the meaning of the language name is something like 'proper speech', based on the word /gugu/ 'speech' and cognates in Djirbal /badjun/ 'proper' and in Guugu-Yimidhir /budun/ 'very' (1973:15).
References

Gugu-badhun language CD ROM. c 2005. Townsville, Qld : Grail Films. L KIT G617.003/1.
Sutton, Peter. 1973. Gugu-Badhun and its neighbours: a linguistic salvage study, Macquarie University: MA. (MS 694).

Status
Confirmed
Location
State
QLD
Location information
It is believed that the Gugu-badhun flourished in areas ranging from the west of Ingham and Abergowrie almost to Einasleigh, with a concentration around the Valley of Lagoons area north west of Townsville (Gugu-badhun language CD ROM). The Gugu-Badhun inhabited the upper Burdekin (on both sides of the river), north to Meadowbank, Glenharding and Wairuna Stations, where they had their border with the Warungu. Their southern border was the Clark River, about where it joins the Burdekin. There they met the Gudjal (also known as Gur(i)djal). These three tribes, running north to south, formed something of a unity. On the west the Gugu-Badhun met the Agwamin (north-west), the Wamin (due west) and possibly the Mbara (south-west), along the Great Diving Rangeā€¦ On the east they met the Njawaygi, probably just west of the mountain range that separates the dry country of the inland from the wet forests of the coast (the Seaview Range). They may have met the Wulguru or Bindal in the south east about the Star River, but it is likely their territory did not go further than Ewan in that direction, where they probably met the Gudjal (Sutton 1973:14-15).
Maps
-
Catalogue
Search MURA the AIATSIS catalogue, for items about this language
Speakers
Speaker table
Speaker NILS table
1-19 years20-39 years40-59 years60+
4444
NILS endangerment grade
0
Documentation
Document Score: 
8
Documentation table: 
TypeDocumentation StatusDocumentation Score
Word listLess than 20 pages1
Text CollectionLess than 20 pages1
GrammarSmall grammar (100-200 pages)3
Audio-visualMore than 103
Manuscript Note: 
tape transcription/field note available
Grammar: 
Sutton, Peter. 1973. Gugu-Badhun and its neighbours: a linguistic salvage study, Macquarie University: MA.
Dictionary: 
-
Programs
Activities: 
A Gugu-badhun language CD ROM is produced in 2005.
People: 
Peter Sutton, Tasaku Tsunoda
Indigenous organisations: 
-
Classification
Classification table: 
SourceFamilyGroupSub-groupNameRelationship
Ethnologue (2005)Pama-NyunganMaricGugu Badhun
Dixon (2002)GREATER MARIC GROUPMaric proper subgroupGugu-BadhunWarungu* Sutton (1973), Tsunoda (1974) further dialects: Gugu-Badhun, Gudjal(a)
Wurm (1994)Pama-NyunganMaricGugu Badhun
Walsh (1981)Pama-NyunganMaricMariGugu Badhun
Oates (1975)Pama-NyunganMaricMariGugu Badhun
Wurm (1972)Pama-NyunganPama-MaricMariKoko Patun
O'Grady, Voegelin & Voegelin (1966)Pama-NyunganPama-MaricMariKoko Patun