Y233: Wakaman

AIATSIS code: 
Y233
AIATSIS reference name: 
Wakaman

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Name
Thesaurus heading language
Thesaurus heading people
ABN name
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ABS name
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Horton name
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Ethnologue name
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ISO 639-3 code
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Tindale name
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Tindale (1974)
O'Grady et al (1966)
Glottocode
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Other sources
(Kuku-) Wakaman [Patz 1982] Wagaman [Patz 2002]
Synonyms
Kuku
Comment
Comments: 
According to Patz (1982), this is a dialect of Kuku Yalanji Y78. Documentation on Kuku Yalanji may be relevant. Wakaman is not to be confused with Wagaman Y108, which is an alternative name of Agwamin Y132. Previously, Wagaman was listed as a distinct language in the Language Thesaurus (Wagaman / Wakamin language (Y108)), but it is now treated as an alternative name for Agwamin Y132. Items in MURA described as relating to Wakaman (Y108) have been reassigned the appropriate heading - Wagaman Y233 or Agwamin Y132. In some cases the correct identity is not certain (Patz (2002:5) - citing Dixon and Sutton - notes that 'the name Wakaman was used by different informants for different languages'). In such case both headings have been applied.
References: 
  • Dixon, R. M. W. 2002. Australian languages: their nature and development: Cambridge Language Surveys. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Patz, Elisabeth. 1982. A grammar of the Kuku Yalanji language of north Queensland, Australian National University: PhD. (MS 1826).
  • Patz, Elizabeth. 2002. A grammar of the Kuku Yalanji language of north Queensland: Pacific Linguistics 527. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
Status: 
Confirmed
Location
State / Territory: 
QLD
Location information: 
Speakers of the Kuku Yalanji language traditionally inhabited an area of over 2000 sq km extending from the Mossman River in the south to the Annan River in the north, bordered by the Pacific Ocean in the east and extending inland to presumably just west of Mt Mulgrave (Patz 2002:6)
Maps: 
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Links
Programs
Activities: 
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People: 
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Indigenous organisations: 
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Speakers
Year Source Speaker numbers
1975Oates-
1984Senate-
1990Schmidt-
1996Census-
2001Census-
2004NILS-
2005Estimate-
2006Census-
2011Census-
2016Census-

Speaker numbers were measured differently across the censuses and various other sources listed in AUSTLANG. You are encouraged to refer to the sources.

Speaker numbers for ‘NILS 2004’ and ‘2005 estimate’ come from 'Table F.3: Numbers of speakers of Australian Indigenous languages (various surveys)' in 'Appendix F NILS endangerment and absolute number results' in McConvell, Marmion and McNicol 2005, pages 198-230 (PDF, 2.5MB).

Documentation
TypeDocumentation StatusDocumentation Score
Word list-
Text Collection-
Grammar-
Audio-visual-
Manuscript note: 
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Grammar: 
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Dictionary: 
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Classification
SourceFamilyGroupSub-groupNameRelationship
Ethnologue (2005)
Dixon (2002)(Kuku-) WakamanKuku-Yalanji Patz (1982) further dialects: Kuku-Njungkul, Kuku-Bididji, Kuku-Dungay, Kuku- Buyundji, Kuku-Kulunggur, Kuku-Yalaja (or Kuku-Yelandji), Koko-Walandja, (Kuku-)Wakura, (Kuku-) Wakaman, (Kuku-)Djangun, (Kuku-) Muluridji, Kuku-Jakandji
Wurm (1994)
Walsh (1981)
Oates (1975)
Wurm (1972)
O'Grady, Voegelin and Voegelin (1966)