Y55: Morrobolam

AIATSIS code: 
Y55
AIATSIS reference name: 
Morrobolam

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Name
ABN name
-
ABS name
Morrobalama
Horton name
Lamalama
Ethnologue name
Umbuygamu
ISO 639-3 code
umg
Tindale name
Barungguan (Umbuigamu)
Thesaurus heading language
Morrobolam language Y55
Thesaurus heading (old)
Umbuygamu / Morrobalama language (Y55) (Qld SD54-12)
Tindale (1974)
Barunguan (typographical error), Baka (Kandju term), Banjigam (Bakanambia term), Jintjingga (native name of a place at mouth of Stewart River), Yintjingga, Njindingga, Umbuigamu (horde), Umbindhamu (horde), Ganganda.
O'Grady et al (1966)
Glottocode
umbu1256
Other sources
Umpuykumu [Thompson PMS 1825] Umbuygamu (the Umpila name for this language), Morrobalama (speakers' term used for their own language), Morrobolam language [Rigsby 1992:356] Morrabalama [Rigsby 2005:136] Morrobolam (a clan name) Verstraete [2018 p.c.]
Synonyms
Morroba Lama, Umbuygamu, Kuuku yani, Barunguan, Yindyingga, Ajarumbal, Aradal, Bungkol, Burlngulu, Juwinbadha, Barungguan, Umpuykumu, Umbuykamu, Baka, Banjigam, Jintjingga, Yintjingga, Njindingga, Umbuigamu, Umbindhamu, Ganganda
Comment
Comments: 
Formerly listed as Umbuygamu (Y55) in this database. Three languages Lamalama Y136, Rimanggudinhma Y195 and Morrobolam (Y55) form a genetic subgroup of Paman known as Lamalamic. 'This subgroup is defined by shared innovations in phonology and morphology, specifically the development of voicing contrasts in trills, the setup of verbal inflections, and a number of innovative forms in nominal morphology. Within this subgroup, Morrobolam and Lamalama form a phonologically innovative branch, while Rumanggudinhma forms a more conservative branch' (Verstraete, 2018:1-2). Morrobolam is the name of a clan who speak a language also known by the exonym Umbuygamu (Y55). Morrobalama is a mis-transcription, probably influenced by the word 'Lamalama' (Verstraete, 2018 p.c.).
References: 
  • Ogilvie, Sarah. 1994a. A wordlist of the Morrobalama (Umbuygamu) language of Cape York, Australia. Umagico: Umagico Council.
  • Ogilvie, Sarah. 1994b. The Morrobalama (Umbuygamu) language of Cape York Peninsula, Australia, Australian National University: MA Thesis, MS 3634.
  • Rigsby, Bruce. 1992. The languages of the Princess Charlotte Bay region. In The language game: papers in memory of Donald C. Laycock, eds Tom Dutton, Malcolm Ross and Darrell Tryon, 353-360. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Rigsby, Bruce. 2005. The languages of Eastern Cape York Peninsula and linguistic anthropology. In Donald Thomson: the man and the scholar, eds Bruce Rigsby and Nicolas Peterson, 129-142. Canberra: Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia.
  • Thompson, David A. 1975. Distribution of dialects along the east coast and hinterland of the Cape York Peninsula, Queensland. [PMS 1825].
  • Verstraete, Jean-Christophe. 2012. Contact-induced restructuring of pronominal morphosyntax in Umpithamu (Cape York Pensinsula, Australia). Diachronica. 29(3). 326-358. doi: 10.1075/dia.29.3.03ver
  • Verstraete, Jean-Christophe. 2018. The Genetic Status of Lamalamic: Phonological and Morphological Evidence, in Oceanic Linguistics, 57:1.
Status: 
Confirmed
Location
State / Territory: 
QLD
Location information: 
Originally spoken in the Princess Charlotte Bay region of the eastern coast of Cape York (Ogilvie 1994:1). ... the focal area is around Repmana or Dinner Hole, a lagoon that transects the sand ridges about 10 kmwest of the North Kennedy mouth. One of the clans, the Morrobolam, owns several non-contiguous countries inland and one the coast, including the Cliff Islands just offshore (Rigsby 1992:356). Running Creek (probably Balclutha Creek) (Thompson PMS 1825). Contemporary location: Umagico and Coen (Ogilvie in Encyclopedia of Language & Linguistics 2006 Elsiever vol 8:340). Verstraete reports there are no speakers at Umagico; this was the place where people were forcibly resettled in the 1960s. There were some people there into the 1990s (2018 p.c.).
Maps: 
-
Catalogue
Links
Programs
Activities: 
A documentation project funded by Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project is carried out from December 2006 to December 2009 (http://wwwling.arts.kuleuven.be/fll/hrelp/).
People: 
Sarah Ogilvie, Bruce Rigsby, Bruce Sommer, Jean-Christophe Verstraete.
Indigenous organisations: 
-
Speakers
Year Source Speaker numbers
1975Oates-
1984Senate-
1990Schmidt-
1996Census-
2001Census-
2004NILS-
2005Estimate3
2006Census-
2011Census-
2016Census-

Speaker numbers were measured differently across the censuses and various other sources listed in AUSTLANG. You are encouraged to refer to the sources.

Speaker numbers for ‘NILS 2004’ and ‘2005 estimate’ come from 'Table F.3: Numbers of speakers of Australian Indigenous languages (various surveys)' in 'Appendix F NILS endangerment and absolute number results' in McConvell, Marmion and McNicol 2005, pages 198-230 (PDF, 2.5MB).

Documentation
Type Documentation Status Documentation Score
Word list Small (20-100 pages) 2
Text Collection None 0
Grammar Sketch grammar (less than 100 pages) 2
Audio-visual More than 10 3
Manuscript note: 
tape transcription/field note available
Grammar: 

Ogilvie, Sarah. 1994. The Morrobalama (Umbuygamu) language of Cape York Peninsula, Australia, Australian National University: MA.

Sommer, Bruce. 1998. Umbuygamu. Townsville, Ethnografix.

Dictionary: 
Ogilvie, Sarah. 1994. A wordlist of the Morrobalama (Umbuygamu) language of Cape York, Australia. Umagico: Umagico Council.
Classification
Source Family Group Sub-group Name Relationship
Ethnologue (2005) Pama-Nyungan Paman Lamalamic Umbuygamu
Dixon (2002) SOUTH-EAST CAPE YORK PENINSULA GROUP Lama subgroup* Morroba-Lama (or Umbuygamu) Morroba-Lama (or Umbuygamu)
Wurm (1994) Pama-Nyungan Paman Umbuygamu
Walsh (1981) Pama-Nyungan Paman Lamalamic Umbuygamu
Oates (1975) Pama-Nyungan Lamalamic Umbuygamu Umbuygamu
Wurm (1972) Pama-Nyungan Lamalamic Umbuykamu Umbuykamu
O'Grady, Voegelin and Voegelin (1966)