W55: Jaburu

AIATSIS code: 
W55
AIATSIS reference name: 
Jaburu

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Thesaurus heading language
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Tindale (1974)
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O'Grady et al (1966)
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Comment
Comments: 
Capell (1963) mentions Jaburu as a north-eastern dialect of Wadjari A39 described by Fink. Von Brandenstein (PMS 2136) also refers to Fink and her 'dialect of the Lower Wooramel River', expanding its location to include Milgun Station, Horseshoe Mine and Landor, on the upper Gascoyne River. Davidson's (1938) map locates Yabaroo (W55) at the head of the Sanford River, north-east of Cheangwa A97 and south-east of Muliarra A18. Davidson's 'Comparative vocabularies of nineteen Western Australian Language' manuscript (MS 1097) contains language data for Yabberu (W55), also in keyboarded form in Nash (PMS 6179). Von Brandenstein (1967) glosses Jaburru as 'north' when noting the prominence of compass-point naming conventions in Wadjarri A39 country, in addition to Wardal A19 as 'east' and Pidungu A40 as 'west'. Daisy Bates (MS 94:8) also notes that Yabbaroo means 'north' and that it is a term 'used by all the southern tribes from Perth along the coast almost to Cossack' (in the Pilbara). Note however that she also uses it as a specific group name, and that this is a different identity to Jaburu (W55). The use of this term over a wide area, from the south-west up to the Pilbara, is also reported by Tindale (1974), who gives Jaburu as an alternative name for six different names: Wiilman W7, Widi A13, Kalaamaya A4, Nhanhagardi A93, Yuat W11 and Inggarda W19. Given the relative reference of this name, it is hard to be sure of its identity. However, as there is language data associated with a Jaburu located roughly in the Wajarri / Wadjarri A39 area, it is included as a language heading in AUSTLANG.
References: 
  • Brandenstein, Carl G. von. 1967. The language situation in the Pilbara - past and present. In Papers in Australian Linguistics 2, 1-20a, + 27 maps. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Capell, Arthur. 1963. Linguistic survey of Australia. Canberra: Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies.
  • Davidson, Daniel Sutherland. 1928-1950. Comparative vocabularies of nineteen Western Australian Language. (MS 1097)
  • Davidson, Daniel Sutherland. 1938. An ethnic map of Australia. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, vol. 79, no. 4. (B D252.24/E1)
  • McCaskill, D.L. Rev. 1968. Aboriginal rock engravings at Boom Boom Spring, Waldburg Range. Perth: Western Australian Naturalists' Club. (S 50/18, v.11, n.2)
  • Nash, David (ed.). 1996. Improved keyboarded version of Davidson, Daniel Sutherland. Comparative vocabularies of nineteen Western Australian languages: draft analysis. (PMS 6179)
Status: 
Potential data
Location
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Location information: 
Lower Wooramel River, was spoken at Milgun Station and Horseshoe Mine and extended W t o Landor, all on the upper Gascoyne River. (Fink, in Capell 1963). West of Meekatharra (Davidson, in Nash 2006). [at the head of the Sanford River, north-east of 'Cheangwa' and south-east of 'Muliarra'] (Davidson 1938). Waldburg Range...150 miles north-west of Meekatharra (McCaskill 1968).
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Speakers
Year Source Speaker numbers
1975Oates-
1984Senate-
1990Schmidt-
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2016Census-

Speaker numbers were measured differently across the censuses and various other sources listed in AUSTLANG. You are encouraged to refer to the sources.

Speaker numbers for ‘NILS 2004’ and ‘2005 estimate’ come from 'Table F.3: Numbers of speakers of Australian Indigenous languages (various surveys)' in 'Appendix F NILS endangerment and absolute number results' in McConvell, Marmion and McNicol 2005, pages 198-230 (PDF, 2.5MB).

Documentation
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Classification
Source Family Group Sub-group Name Language-dialect relationships
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