Y130: Biyay

AIATSIS code: 
Y130
AIATSIS reference name: 
Biyay

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Name
Thesaurus heading language
Thesaurus heading people
ABN name
-
ABS name
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Horton name
Wargamaygan (Bandjin)
Ethnologue name
-
ISO 639-3 code
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Tindale name
Bandjin
Tindale (1974)
Bijai (language name), Biaigiri, Bandyin, Banjin, Bundjin, Bandji (incorrect), Uradig, Kunyin.
O'Grady et al (1966)
Bijai
Glottocode
-
Other sources
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Synonyms
Wargamaygan, Bandjin, Warakamai, Bandji, Bandyin, Banjin, Biaigiri, Bijai, Bundjin, Kunyin, Uradig, Bandyi
Comment
Comments: 
Biyay (Y130), Wargamay Y134 and Biyay Y220 are closely related dialects for which Wargamay is used as a language name. Dixon refers to lexical differences between two dialects: Biyay (Y130) of Hinchinbrook Island and at Lucinda Point on the mainland and Biyay Y220 of the mainland, south-west of Lucinda Point. Both groups of Biyay refer to themselves as Biyaygiri, constructed with the word for 'no' biyay + the derivational suffix '-giri 'with'. Wargamay speakers referred to Biyaygiri (Y130) as /gu?inbara/, constructed with gu?in 'coast' and -bara a derivational affix meaning 'belonging to' (Dixon, 1981: 2-3). Previously Bandjin was treated as both people and language name in the Thesaurus for the code Y130. Bandjin is a people name from Tindale (1974:165) based on the word /ba?djin/ 'sea water' (Dixon, 1981:3).
References: 
  • Dixon, R.M.W. 1981. Wargamay. In Handbook of Australian languages vol. 2, eds R.M.W. Dixon and B.J. Blake, 1-144 + map. Canberra: ANU Press.
  • Tindale, Norman B. 1974. Aboriginal tribes of Australia: their terrain, environmental controls, distribution, limits, and proper names. Berkeley: University of California Press/Canberra: Australian National University Press.
Status: 
Confirmed
Location
State / Territory: 
QLD
Location information: 
Hinchinbrook Island and Lucinda Point on the adjoining mainland. Those on Lucinda Point are usually called Biaigiri, and once may have been a separate tribal unit (Tindale 1974:165). on Hinchinbrook Island and the adjacent mainland (south from the present town of Cardwell), a country of mountainous jungle and flat mangrove swamps, also appear to have spoken a dialect referred to as Biyay (and to have been themselves called Biyaygiri) (Dixon 1981:3).
Maps: 
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Links
Programs
Activities: 
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People: 
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Speakers
Year Source Speaker numbers
1975Oates0
1984Senate-
1990Schmidt-
1996Census-
2001Census-
2004NILS-
2005Estimate0
2006Census-
2011Census-
2016Census-

Speaker numbers were measured differently across the censuses and various other sources listed in AUSTLANG. You are encouraged to refer to the sources.

Speaker numbers for ‘NILS 2004’ and ‘2005 estimate’ come from 'Table F.3: Numbers of speakers of Australian Indigenous languages (various surveys)' in 'Appendix F NILS endangerment and absolute number results' in McConvell, Marmion and McNicol 2005, pages 198-230 (PDF, 2.5MB).

Documentation
TypeDocumentation StatusDocumentation Score
Word listLess than 20 pages1
Text CollectionNone0
GrammarNone0
Audio-visualLess than 11
Manuscript note: 
tape transcription/field note available (vocabulary only)
Grammar: 
-
Dictionary: 
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Classification
SourceFamilyGroupSub-groupNameRelationship
Ethnologue (2005)
Dixon (2002)
Wurm (1994)Pama-NyunganDyirbalicBandyin
Walsh (1981)Pama-NyunganDyirbalicBandyin
Oates (1975)Pama-NyunganDjirbalicBandjin
Wurm (1972)Pama-NyunganPama-MaricDyirbalicBandyin?
O'Grady, Voegelin and Voegelin (1966)Pama-NyunganPama-MaricYaraBandjin