S33: Weki Weki

AIATSIS code: 
S33
AIATSIS reference name: 
Weki Weki

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Name
ABN name
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ABS name
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Horton name
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Ethnologue name
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ISO 639-3 code
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Tindale name
Watiwati (Biangil)
Thesaurus heading language
Weki Weki language S33
Thesaurus heading (old)
Biangil / Biyangil / Piangil language (S33) (Vic SI54-16)
Tindale (1974)
Wathiwathi (wati = no), Watthiwatthi, Wattewatte, Watty-watty, Wotti-wotti, Withaija, Wohdi Wohdi, Woani (means 'man'), Woonyi, Dacournditch (horde between Tyntynder and Swan Hill), Biangil (place name Piangil).
O'Grady et al (1966)
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Glottocode
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Other sources
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Synonyms
Piangil, Biangil, Watiwati, Wathiwathi, Watthiwatthi, Wattewatte, Watty watty, Wotti wotti, Withaija, Wohdi Wohdi, Woani, Woonyi, Dacournditch
Comment
Comments: 
See also Warga Warga S21. Weki Weki and Warga Warga refer to the same language (Clark 1996, 2005), of which the community-preferred name is Weki Weki. The name Piangil, a place name, has been linked to both Weki Weki and Wadi Wadi D4. According to Clark (1990:404), Dixon (Working Papers) has suggested that Wadiwadi D4 was divided into two dialects, 'Piangil' and 'non-Piangil'. Blake and Reid (1998:4-5) note that 'there are two tongues that bear the name Wadi-Wadi, one centred around Swan Hill and the other around Piangil'. The 'Piangil' Wadi Wadi was previously listed as an alternative name for both Wadi Wadi D4 and Weki Weki (S33). Blake, Hercus, Morey and Ryan (2011) comment, 'There is a possibility that what we call Wati Wati (Piangil) was in fact the language of the Weki Weki people, though this cannot be proven.' Based on this, a separate record for Wadi Wadi (Piangil) D67 has been created, while also noting that the two names may refer to the same language. Previously there was a Thesaurus heading for Warga Warga (S21), Wadi Wadi (D4) and Biangil / Biyangil / Piangil (S33). Given the common identity of Weki Weki and Warga Warga, and the liklihood (but not certainty) of 'Piangil Wadi Wadi' being the language of the Weki Weki people, the Thesaurus now has language headings for Weki Weki (S33), Wadi Wadi (D4) and Wadi Wadi (Piangil) (D67). However, given the uncertainty around the identity of Wadi Wadi (Piangil), documentation for Weki Weki and Wadi Wadi may also be relevant.
References: 
  • Clark, Ian. 2009. Dhudhuroa and Yaithmathang languages and social groups in north-east Victoria - a reconstruction. Aboriginal History 33:201-229.
Status: 
Confirmed
Location
State / Territory: 
VIC
NSW
Location information: 
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Maps: 
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Catalogue
Links
Programs
Activities: 
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People: 
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Indigenous organisations: 
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Speakers
Year Source Speaker numbers
1975Oates-
1984Senate-
1990Schmidt-
1996Census-
2001Census-
2004NILS-
2005Estimate-
2006Census-
2011Census-
2016Census-

Speaker numbers were measured differently across the censuses and various other sources listed in AUSTLANG. You are encouraged to refer to the sources.

Speaker numbers for ‘NILS 2004’ and ‘2005 estimate’ come from 'Table F.3: Numbers of speakers of Australian Indigenous languages (various surveys)' in 'Appendix F NILS endangerment and absolute number results' in McConvell, Marmion and McNicol 2005, pages 198-230 (PDF, 2.5MB).

Documentation
TypeDocumentation StatusDocumentation Score
Word listLess than 20 pages1
Text CollectionNone0
GrammarNone0
Audio-visualNone0
Manuscript note: 
not available
Grammar: 
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Dictionary: 
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Classification
SourceFamilyGroupSub-groupNameRelationship
Ethnologue (2005)
Dixon (2002)
Wurm (1994)
Walsh (1981)
Oates (1975)UnclassifiedBiangil
Wurm (1972)
O'Grady, Voegelin and Voegelin (1966)