A100: Mardo

AIATSIS code: 
A100
AIATSIS reference name: 
Mardo

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Name
ABN name
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ABS name
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Horton name
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Ethnologue name
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ISO 639-3 code
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Tindale name
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Thesaurus heading language
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Thesaurus heading (old)
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Tindale (1974)
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O'Grady et al (1966)
Mardudjara
Glottocode
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Other sources
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Synonyms
Mardudjara
Comment
Comments: 

Wurm (1972) and O'Grady et al. (1966) list Mardo as a dialect of the Western Desert language A80, distinct from Martu Wangka A86. Mardo, meaning 'man, people' according to Tonkinson (1991:2), is a name used to refer to a group of people encompassing several dialect groups. The number and identity of these dialect groups varies across the literature. Tonkinson (1991:12) includes Gardujarra A51, Manyjilyjarra A51.1, Budijarra A54, Gurajarra A85 and Giyajarra A52, Bird (2001:1) includes Gardujarra A51, Manjilyjarra A51.1, Putijarra A54, Budijarra A54?, Gurajarra A85 and Warnman A62, while Davenport (2005:ix) says there are eight groups in total. The language spoken by Martu people is known as Martu Wangka A86, though this name is used in different ways, as a contemporary name of a specific language variety (or communilect) from Jigalong station based on Kartujarra A51, Manjiljarra A51.1 and Putijarra A54 (Marsh 1972, in Thieberger 1993:193, 202), and as an alternative name for various Martu language varieties (Thieberger 1993:194, 202). See and use Martu Wangka A86. Note that there is another (very similar) name, Maduwongga A6 (Tindale 1974:247), though the location described by Tindale is much further south than that of Martu Wangka A86 so it would appear to be a distinct language variety. There is very little information available about Maduwongga. Some sources (e.g. Oates 1975 and O'Grady et al. 1966) give Maduwonga as an alternative name for Gugada C3, while the location Tindale describes overlaps with the location of Wangkatha A12.

References: 
  • Oates, Lynette F. 1975. The 1973 supplement to a revised linguistic survey of Australia. Armidale: Armidale Christian Book Centre.
  • O'Grady, G. N., C. F. Voegelin and F. M. Voegelin. 1966. Languages of the world: Indo-Pacific fascicle six. Anthropological Linguistics 8(2).
  • Thieberger, Nicholas. 1993. Handbook of Western Australian Aboriginal languages south of the Kimberley region: Pacific Linguistics C-124. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Tindale, Norman B. 1974. Aboriginal tribes of Australia: their terrain, environmental controls, distribution, limits, and proper names. Berkeley: University of California Press/Canberra: Australian National University Press.
  • Tonkinson, Robert. 1991. The Mardu Aborigines: living the dream in Australia's desert. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
  • Wurm, S. A. 1972. Languages of Australia and Tasmania. The Hague: Mouton.
Status: 
Unconfirmed
Location
State / Territory: 
WA
Location information: 
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Maps: 
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Catalogue
Links
Programs
Activities: 
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People: 
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Indigenous organisations: 
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Speakers
Year Source Speaker numbers
1975Oates-
1984Senate-
1990Schmidt-
1996Census-
2001Census-
2004NILS-
2005Estimate-
2006Census-
2011Census-
2016Census-

Speaker numbers were measured differently across the censuses and various other sources listed in AUSTLANG. You are encouraged to refer to the sources.

Speaker numbers for ‘NILS 2004’ and ‘2005 estimate’ come from 'Table F.3: Numbers of speakers of Australian Indigenous languages (various surveys)' in 'Appendix F NILS endangerment and absolute number results' in McConvell, Marmion and McNicol 2005, pages 198-230 (PDF, 2.5MB).

Documentation
Type Documentation Status Documentation Score
Word list None 0
Text Collection None 0
Grammar None 0
Audio-visual None 0
Manuscript note: 
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Grammar: 
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Dictionary: 
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Classification
Source Family Group Sub-group Name Relationship
Ethnologue (2005)          
Dixon (2002)          
Wurm (1994)          
Walsh (1981)          
Oates (1975)          
Wurm (1972) Pama-Nyungan Southwest (or Nyungic) Western Desert Language Mardo  
O'Grady, Voegelin and Voegelin (1966) Pama-Nyungan Southwest Wati Mardo