A51.1: Manyjilyjarra

AIATSIS code: 
A51.1
AIATSIS reference name: 
Manyjilyjarra

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Name
ABN name
-
ABS name
Manyjilyjarra
Horton name
Mardu (Mandjildjara/Manyjilyjarra)
Ethnologue name
Martu Wangka [Manyjilyjara]
ISO 639-3 code
-
Tindale name
Mandjildjara
Thesaurus heading language
Manyjilyjarra language A51.1
Thesaurus heading (old)
Manjiljarra / Martu Wangka language (A51.1) (WA SF51-12)
Tindale (1974)
Mandjildara ; Mandjiltjara ; Manjiljara ; Mantjildjara ; Mantjiltjara
O'Grady et al (1966)
Glottocode
-
Other sources
Mandjiltjarra, Martu [<ozbib>Wangka Maya PALC 2008:4$6417</ozbib>] Mandjiltjarra [<ozbib>Burgman 2009:iii$7416</ozbib>]
Synonyms
Martu Wangka, Manyjilyjara, Mardu, Mandjildjara/Manyjilyjarra, Budijarra, Gardujarra, Giyajarra, Kartudjara, Keiadjara, Mandjildjara, Potidjara, Wanman, Jindi, Katutjara, Madu, Maduwongga, Mandijildjara, Mandildjara, Mandjihjarra, Mandjiidjarra, Mandjildara, Mandjildjarra, Mandjiltjara, Mandjiltjarra, Mandjintjarra, Mandjindja, Mangula, Mangundjara, Manjiljara, Manjiljarra, Manjiljarra/Kartujarra, Manjinjiwonga, Mantjila, Mantjildjara, Mantjiltjara, Mardo, Marduwangga, Martu wangka, Matu wangga, Matuntara, Matutjarra, Matuwangga, Nanggarangku, Martu
Comment
Comments: 
Manyjilyjarra (A51.1) and Mantjintjarra A33 are names of some form of the Western Desert language A80. However, it is unclear whether these names refer to the same variety or not. Previously Manjiljarra (A51.1) was included in the Thesaurus heading for Mandjindja A33. According to the WA Handbook, Marsh says that Manjiljarra (A51.1) is one of the languages (in addition to Kartujarra A51 and Putijarra A54) on which the Jigalong communilect Martu Wangka A86 is based. Further, the Handbook notes that the name Martu Wangka is sometimes also used as an alternative name for Manjiljarra (A51.1) and some other languages spoken by Martu people (Thieberger 1993:202).
References: 
  • Burgman, Albert. 2009. Manyjilyjarra - English dictionary 2009. South Hedland, WA: Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre.
  • Dixon, Sally. 2011. How to read and write Pilbara languages. South Hedland: Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre.
  • Marsh, James L. 1977. The notion of balance in Mantjiltjara grammar. In Language problems and Aboriginal education, eds E. Brumby and E. Vászolyi, 25-33. Perth: Mt Lawley CAE.
  • Stanton, John. 1983. Old business, new owners: succession and the Law on the fringe of the Western Desert. In Aborigines, land and land rights, ed. Nick Peterson and Marcia Langton, 160-171. Canberra: AIAS.
  • Thieberger, Nicholas. 1993. Handbook of Western Australian Aboriginal languages south of the Kimberley region: Pacific Linguistics C-124. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Tindale, Norman B. 1974. Aboriginal tribes of Australia: their terrain, environmental controls, distribution, limits, and proper names. Berkeley: University of California Press/Canberra: Australian National University Press.
  • Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre. 2008. Manyjilyjarra sketch grammar. South Hedland, WA: Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre.
Status: 
Confirmed
Location
State / Territory: 
WA
Location information: 
Along Canning Stock Route between Well 30, n.n. ['Tjundu'tjundu] and Well 38, n.n. ['Watjaparni]; south about 50 miles (80 km.) to a hill called Tjanbari, not yet identified, and unidentified waters called Kolajuru, Karu-kada, Keweilba, and Kunkunba; northward only a few miles from the line of the Stock Route to unidentified places called Tjam:ala and Maindu; eastward no farther than about Longitude 126°E to an unlocalized water known as Ngila. In 1964 W. B. MacDougall found a party of nine women at Imiri on Percival Lakes who used the above tribal designation (Tindale 1974). The region of the Canning Stock Route north of Lake Disappointment (Marsh 1977). Note that these locations are different from the one shown on the map by Stanton (1983). The original Manyjilyjarra territory extended east-ward and west-ward along the Canning Stock Route north of Lake Disappointment toward Lake Carnegie (Marsh 1976:2, in Wangka Maya PALC 2008:8). ... the central Great Sandy Desert region of northwest Western Australia. It is north east of the town of Telfer and is dissected by the Canning Stock Route (Burgman 2009:iii). Contemporary location: Strelley, Kunawarritji, Wiluna, Newman, Nullagine, Punmu (Dixon 2011:50). Scattered Aboriginal communities, mission stations, cattle and sheep ranches and towns on the edges of the Gibson and Great Sandy Deserts of Western Australia, and the Jigalong Community (Burgman 2009:iii).
Maps: 
  • Tindale, Norman. 1974. Tribal boundaries in Aboriginal Australia. Canberra: Division of National Mapping, Department of National Development.
  • Stanton, John. 1983. Old business, new owners: succession and the Law on the fringe of the Western Desert. In Aborigines, land and land rights, eds N Peterson and M Langton, 160-171. Canberra: AIAS.
  • Sharp, Janet and Nick Thieberger. 2001. Wangka Maya, the Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre. In Forty years on, eds J Simpson et al., 325-335. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Sharp, Janet. 2004. Nyangumarta: a language of the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
Catalogue
Links
Programs
Activities: 
-
People: 
Patrick McConvell, James Marsh, Desmond Taylor, Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre, W.H. Douglas, M. Clendon, Janet Sharpe, Nick Thieberger
Indigenous organisations: 
Speakers
Year Source Speaker numbers
1975Oates-
1984Senate-
1990Schmidt-
1996Census-
2001Census-
2004NILS-
2005Estimate-
2006Census170
2011Census346
2016Census311

Speaker numbers were measured differently across the censuses and various other sources listed in AUSTLANG. You are encouraged to refer to the sources.

Speaker numbers for ‘NILS 2004’ and ‘2005 estimate’ come from 'Table F.3: Numbers of speakers of Australian Indigenous languages (various surveys)' in 'Appendix F NILS endangerment and absolute number results' in McConvell, Marmion and McNicol 2005, pages 198-230 (PDF, 2.5MB).

Documentation
Type Documentation Status Documentation Score
Word list Small (20-100 pages) 2
Text Collection Less than 20 pages 1
Grammar Small grammar (100-200 pages) 3
Audio-visual More than 10 3
Manuscript note: 
tape transcription/field note available
Grammar: 

Marsh, Jim. 1976. The grammar of Mantjiltjara, Arizona State University (MA).

Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre. 2008. Manyjilyjarra sketch grammar. South Hedland, WA: Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre.

Dictionary: 
McConvell, Patrick. 1980. Manjiljarra wangka: Manjiljarra-English dictionary draft. Strelley, WA: Strelley Literacy Centre/Darwin: Darwin Community College, School of Australian Linguistics. Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre. 1990. Manjiljarra picture dictionary. South Hedland, WA: Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre. Burgman, Albert. 2009. Manyjilyjarra - English dictionary 2009. South Hedland, WA: Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre.
Classification
Source Family Group Sub-group Name Relationship
Ethnologue (2005) Pama-Nyungan South-West Wati Martu Wangka [Manyjilyjara] Martu Wangka [dialects: Manyjilyjara (Mantjiltjara), Kartujarra (Kartutjara, Kardutjara, Kadaddjara, Kardutjarra, Kiadjara, Gardudjara, Gagudjara), Puditara (Budidjara, Putujara), Yulparitja (Yilparitja, Yulbaridja), Wangkajunga (Wangkajungka). Mantjiltjara and Kartutjara are two ethnic groups speaking almost identical dialects. High inherent intelligibility between Yulparitja and Wangkajunga. Speakers of the 4 dialects can use the same written language with possible minor adjustments, including vocabulary change, partly needed because of cultural identity factors.]
Dixon (2002)
Wurm (1994) Pama-Nyungan South-West Mandjildjara
Walsh (1981) Pama-Nyungan South-West Wati/Western Desert Mandjildjara
Oates (1975) Pama-Nyungan Western Desert Proper Wati Mandjildjara
Wurm (1972) Pama-Nyungan Southwest (or Nyungic) Western Desert Language Mantjiltjara
O'Grady, Voegelin and Voegelin (1966) Pama-Nyungan Southwest Wati Mandijildjara