K15: Bardi

AIATSIS Code: 
K15
AIATSIS Reference name: 
Bardi

tab group

Name
ABN Name
Bardi language
ABS Name
Bardi
Horton Name
Bardi
Ethnologue name
Bardi
ISO 639-3 code
bcj
Tindale name
Baada
Thesaurus heading
Bardi language (K15) (WA SE 51-02)
Tindale (1974)
Bad, Ba:d, Bard, Barda, Bardi, Bad (Capell [1956] writes it as Bad).
O'Grady et al (1966)
Barda, Bardi
Glottocode
bard1255
Other sources
Synonyms
Baardi
Baard
Baada
Ba:d
Ba:di
Baad
Bad
Bard
Barda
Board
Comment
Language comment
According to Bowern (2008:59-60), Bardi and Jawi K16 are mutually intelligible dialects and show few differences. They have merged over the last thirty years, but the earliest sources of Jawi indicate that the differences used to be more substantial. Bowern also recognises another closely related, but slightly different, dialect named Baard K69. This is the dialect from the northern and western side of the Dampier Peninsula, which now centres on the Lombadina community. Bowern (2012:8) mentions two potential further dialects of Bardi, Mayala and Nyindinyindi. Mayala is generally used to refer to a location - the islands off the coast of the Dampier Peninsula mainland - but Bowern says there is some evidence that it may also be a language (dialect) name. Nyindinyindi was reported in a recording by Peile, though the name is not known these days and Bowern says the language sounds very similar to other Bardi varieties. Neither of these are separately listed in this database. McGregor (2010:209) categorises Bardi as one of the Western Nyulnyulan languages, along with Jawi K16, Jabirrjabirr K8, Nimanburru K9, Ngumbarl K4 and Nyulnyul K13. He contrasts these with the Eastern Nyulnyulan languages, Nyikina K3, Warrwa K10, Yawuru K1 and Jukun K2.
References

Bowern, Claire. 2008. History of research on Bardi and Jawi. In Encountering Aboriginal languages: studies in the history of Australian linguistics, ed. William McGregor, 59-84. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
Bowern, Claire. 2012. A grammar of Bardi. Berlin/Boston: Walter de Gruyter.
Harvey, Mark. 2008. Non-Pama-Nyungan Languages: land-language associations at colonisation. AILEC 0802.
McGregor, William B. 2010. The semantics, pragmatics and evolution of two verbless negative constructions in Nyulnyul. Oceanic Linguistics 49(1):205-232.
Stokes, Bronwyn. 1982. A description of Nyigina, a language of the West Kimberley, Western Australia (MFE/B52), Australian National University: PhD. (MFE/B52).
Tindale, Norman B. 1974. Aboriginal tribes of Australia: their terrain, environmental controls, distribution, limits, and proper names. Berkeley: University of California Press/Canberra: Australian National University Press.

Status
Confirmed
Location
State
WA
Location information
Cape Leveque peninsula from Cape Borda in west to Cygnet Bay and Cunningham Point on east coast (Tindale 1974). One Arm Point and Lombadina (Stokes 1984:9). Bardi traditional country is the area at the tip of the Dampier Peninsula, a two hundrend and fifty kilometre long peninsula north of Broome. The peninsula is roughly triangular and narrows from its base to a flat point at Cape Leveque, and a further arm just off the peninsula to the east of Cape Leveque for about twenty kilometeres. From the point begins a chain of islands (including Sunday Island), which crosses the entrance of King Sound. Bardi people inhabited the mainland area north of a line drawn between Pender Bay and Cunningham Point, and the islands closest to the tip of the Dampier Peninsula (the two largest being Jayirri and Jalan), while Jawi was spoken on Sunday Island and the islands further east and north (Bowern 2008:60). The general territorial association was to the tip of Dampier Land Peninsula. South-eastward limit: The peninsula going out to Cunningham Point. South-westward limit: The southern shore of Pender Bay appears to have been associated with Bardi rather than Nyulnyul. "Embalgun" (Imbalgoon) is a Bardi name, not Nyulnyul (Harvey ASEDA 802).
Maps
-
Catalogue
Search MURA the AIATSIS catalogue, for items about this language
Speakers
Speaker table
Speaker NILS table
1-19 years20-39 years40-59 years60+
0027
NILS endangerment grade
1
Documentation
Document Score: 
15
Documentation table: 
TypeDocumentation StatusDocumentation Score
Word listLarge (more than 200 pages)4
Text CollectionLarge (more than 200 pages)4
GrammarLarge grammar (more than 200 pages)4
Audio-visualMore than 103
Manuscript Note: 
tape transcription/field note available
Grammar: 
Metcalfe, Christopher Douglas 1975 Bardi verb morphology (northwestern Australia). Canberra: Pacific Linguistics. Bowern, Claire. 2004. Bardi verb morphology in historical perspective, Harvard: PhD. Bowern, Claire. A Learner's Guide to the Bardi Language (draft)
Dictionary: 
Aklif, Gedda. 1999. Ardiyooloon Bardi ngaanka: One Arm Point Bardi dictionary. Halls Creek, WA: Kimberley Language Resource Centre. Metcalfe, Christopher Douglas. Bardi dictionary, draft.
Programs
Activities: 
One Arm Point School gives Bardi lessons half an hour per week in the lower grades (cf. Bowern 2008).
People: 
Gerhardt Laves, Nekes & Worms, Howard Coate, Fr Duncan McNab, Arthur Capell, Norman Tindale, Wilfrid Douglas, Edith Nichols, Gedda Aklif, Claire Bowern, Christopher Metcalfe, Kimberley Language Resource Centre
Indigenous organisations: 
-
Classification
Classification table: 
SourceFamilyGroupSub-groupNameRelationship
Ethnologue (2005)NyulnyulanBardiBardi [dialects: Bardi, Jawi. Intelligibility is adequate between Bardi and Jawi dialects. Related to Nyikina, Warwa, Djawi, Nimanbur, Nyulnyul, Dyaberdyaber, Dyugun, Yawuru.]
Dixon (2002)FITZROY RIVER SUBGROUP*Baardi (or Baard)Baardi (or Baard) McGregor (1996), Aklif (1999) further dialects: Djawi, Njul-Njul, Djabirr-Djabirr, Ngumbarl, Nimanburru
Wurm (1994)NyulnyulanBardi
Walsh (1981)NyulnyulanBardi
Oates (1975)NjulnjulanBardi
Wurm (1972)NyulnyulanBard
O'Grady, Voegelin & Voegelin (1966)NyulnyulanBard